Advice for First Time Skiers: The Ultimate Guide to Ski Trips

Advice for First Time Skiers

Earlier this month, I went skiing for the first time with Mark Warner Holidays. We headed to Tignes, where I had two beginner lessons in a group of four skiing newbies, before heading out onto the blue slopes with experienced skier Vicky Flip Flop (the best ever skiing mentor). I had an absolute blast, but before I left I was really nervous, mostly because I had absolutely no idea what to expect – or even what to wear when going skiing. So, I thought I’d put together this post with my best advice for first time skiers, and try to answer all the questions I had before I left. If you’re thinking about taking your first ever ski trip but you’re still not sure, check out my post Skiing Myths Busted to find out more about what it’s like.

If you’re already sold on skiing, read on. In this post I’ve covered what you need for skiing, some top tips on what to pack, and a few skiing tips for beginners. Hopefully, you’ll find this helpful – and if you have a question please feel free to leave a comment below and I’ll try my best to help!

Advice for First Time Skiers

First Time Skiing – What Do I Need?

Wondering what you need for skiing? The following is a kit list of all the equipment you’ll need for your first ski trip…

In terms of actual ski gear, you’ll need the following: skis, poles, a helmet, and ski boots. You can rent all of these at your ski resort. First Time Skiing What do I NeedWhen I travelled with Mark Warner we pre-booked all the gear through them and simply picked it up at the shop near our hotel on arrival.

On the slopes, you’ll also need to everything on the below ski gear checklist. These aren’t really optional – you’ll probably freeze without them. It can be quite pricey to put this lot together, so if it’s your first time skiing then see if you can borrow some from a friend. I put a shout-out on Facebook and got a reply straight away from my friend Sammi, who was able to lend me almost everything I needed. Most ski gear is one size fits all, so it’s usually pretty easy to borrow. If you can’t borrow, my fellow blogger and beginner skier Amelia (xameliax) got all her kit from Sports Direct and really recommended it (read her post here).

  • Ski Jacket*
  • Saloppettes. Aka ski trousers. Baggy, rustle-y, snowproof trousers with expandable waistlines. Be warned – almost no one looks good in these bad boys!
  • Goggles. Don’t listen to friends who say they just ski in sunglasses. If a blizzard comes along, you’ll need goggles or you won’t be able to see anything. Which makes skiing kind of hard!
  • Ski gloves
  • Ski socks

*Top Tip – find a ski jacket which has a pocket in the sleeve for your ski pass (most do). This way, you don’t have to fumble around getting your lift pass out every time you take the lift. Alternatively, you can buy a retractable lift pass holder to clip onto your salopettes, which you can store the pass in for easier access.

First Time Skiing What do I Need

Our ski gear. From left – Wanderlust Chloe, xameliax, Me.

What to Pack for First Time Skiers

The above kit list is everything you’ll need to hit the slopes, but I still wasn’t really sure what else I needed to pack for my first ski trip. I mean, what do you wear under your ski gear? What do you wear to après ski? Here are a few of my tips for those plaguing questions…

What to wear when going skiing: Under my salopettes, I just wore leggings. I was worried I’d be too cold, but those trousers are surprisingly effective. The guys at the ski rental place told me to just wear long ski socks under my boots, but instead I wore short hiking socks and ankle length leggings, and this was perfectly warm and comfy. On my top half I wore a thermal long sleeved t-shirt, a jumper* (specifically, this one from Mountain Warehouse), and then the ski jacket on top. It was -9º with constant heavy snowfall whilst I was in Tignes, and I was always warm enough.

*Top Tip: Make sure your jumper is shorter than your ski jacket, and tuck it in if it’s not. I learned the hard way and returned from my first ski lesson with the bottom of my jumper completely frozen!

Advice for first time skiers

What to wear the rest of the time: It’s perfectly acceptable to wear your salopettes around town whilst you’re on a ski trip. Most people even wear them to après ski as they’ll head straight from the slopes to a bar. If you’re sick of the sound of rustling, though, you can change into jeans or leggings. Just team them up with a thermal leggings to make sure you stay warm. Layers are key here: go for a thermal base layer, t-shirt and jumper under your ski jacket. That way you can comfortably de-layer whenever you go indoors*.

  • Top Tip: Try to find a nice looking thermal top. If you head into a bar straight from skiing you may find yourself stripping right down to the base layer. And if that’s an unflattering hot pink monstrosity like mine, you’ll probably wish you’d picked something a little nicer!

Accessories: On the slopes you should wear a snood or neck tube rather than a scarf. These stay snugly in place next to your neck and have no trailing ends to get caught. Off the slopes, a neck tube is still easier to deal with than a scarf, and you’ll also want a decent hat*. One brand I’d recommend is ocean and outdoor gear supplier MUSTO. Their Evolution Collection is super high tech and absolutely perfect for first time skiers as well as pros, and includes everything you’ll need. From high performance winter accessories like the Gore-Tex Primaloft Gloves, to thermal base layers, right through to ski jackets like the Snowdrift BR1 Primaloft® Jacket – MUSTO have your ski gear covered.

First Time Skiing What do I Need

The snowdrift BR1 Primaloft® Jacket from MUSTO

*Top Tip: my friend Ruth, who skies often, says she prefers a fleece headband to a hat, because these keep your ears warm without overheating your head. I frequently felt too hot in my thick woolly hat!

Footwear: Finally, for walking around a ski resort you’ll need a good pair of snow boots. Both me and the other beginners bought ours in the Mountain Warehouse sale. Mine – the Ice Womens Snow Boots (£12.99 on Amazon) – were simple velcro ones which were dead warm First Time Skiing What do I Needbut a little bit loose around the ankle, which meant they rubbed a bit. At £12.99 they were a steal though, and with thick socks they were perfect for a week. If you want guaranteed comfort, I’d recommend spending a bit more and picking up some snug lace-up snow boots like the Ohio Womens Snow Boots from Mountain Warehouse.

Checklist to Summarise:

  • thermal leggings
  • thermal top or base layer
  • one or two jumpers or fleeces
  • t-shirts
  • leggings or jeans
  • snood
  • hat, fleece headband, or ear muffs
  • snow boots
Advice for First Time Skiers

Tignes Val Claret

Skiing Tips for Beginners

If you’re going skiing for the first time it can all seem a little daunting. Here are some of my top tips and advice for first time skiers…

  • Let your school know you’re an absolute beginner when you book the classes. I was unfortunately paired with a fairly impatient instructor, and while that spurred me on to do my best it had a negative effect on some of the other girls in my group. Tell the school upfront that it’s your first time skiing and ask them to go easy on you.
  • When you’re renting your equipment, don’t let the staff bully you into taking ski boots that don’t fit right. They’ll act like they know best, but insist on trying new pairs until you feel comfortable. The boots should feel snug, but they shouldn’t be so tight that wearing them for a few hours gives you muscle cramping that lasts all day (which happened to me). Your toes should be able to wiggle and they definitely shouldn’t be squashed against the toe of the boot. And your heel should be flat on the soul of the boot – your foot shouldn’t be so pinned in that it’s floating above the ground! If you do wind up with the wrong boot, you’ll soon know about it – so don’t feel afraid to go back the next day and switch them!
  • Try to pick up your ski equipment as soon as you arrive in the resort. Most people do it on their first morning of skiing – which leads to big queues. Check in and head straight to the rental shop before anyone else does.
  • Remember: you can do this! Skiing for the first time as an adult is a daunting experience. It’s always hard to learn a new skill, and skiing seems to go against all our natural instincts! Try not to overthink it or play through all the potential accidents in your mind. Just pay attention to your instructor and follow them as closely as possible, and take it all one step at a time.
  • Be confident. If your turn goes wrong or you find yourself going faster than you meant to, try to stay calm. Panicking will make you do something dumb and you could hurt yourself. Lean forwards into your skis, don’t think about how fast your going, and focus on slowing yourself down. If in doubt, turn your body to face up the mountain. Your skis will point where your body faces, and if they’re pointing towards the mountain then you’ll stop. Just don’t turn them completely around or you’ll risk Bridget Jones-ing it down backwards!

Advice for First Time Skiers

First Time Skiers’ Questions

Will I fall over? Sorry to be the bearer of bad news here, but yes, you probably will fall over on your first time skiing. Even the experienced skiers I was with fell over a few times. The good news is that snow is pretty soft, and you’ll be going so slowly as a first time skier that you almost definitely won’t hurt yourself. But do make sure you have good insurance!

Can I take my camera skiing? Yes, you can. If you have an expensive DSLR I’d probably leave it at home in case you fall over and break it, but a small digital camera or your phone is perfectly fine on the slopes. Many people take Go Pros – you can even rent ski helmets with the Go Pro attachments on ready. I would avoid selfie sticks though – you’ll have poles in both hands and you need to focus whilst you’re taking your ski classes. Top Tip: wear fingerless or touchscreen gloves underneath your ski gloves. That way your hands won’t freeze when you take the bulky ski gloves off to take that all-important selfie!

Will I have to go on a ski lift? Probably not on your first time skiing. Nursery slopes are far too small to need a ski lift – you’ll probably have to deal with a “magic carpet” like the one in Le lac, Tignes (a sloping travelator enclosed within a tunnel), or possibly a button lift (similar to the seat on a playground zip-wire, you sit against the seat with your skis on the ground and let the lift drag you up the slope). Unless you make it onto one of the harder slopes, you probably don’t need to worry about taking a chair lift.

Advice for First Time Skiers

What do the ski slope colours mean? That all depends on where in the world you are. Here in Europe you have the following:

  • Nursery or baby slopes – almost no gradient, for learning the absolute basics.
  • Green Slopes – Learning or beginner slopes Large, open, gently sloping areas, usually at the base of the ski area.
  • Blue Slopes – Easy. The gradient doesn’t exceed 25% except for short wide sections.
  • Red Slopes – Intermediate. The gradient doesn’t exceed 40% except for short wide sections.
  • Black Slopes – Expert. Can be a wide classification which ranges from just above Red to very steep avalanche chutes.

Check here for more info, and for the classifications in North America or Japan. I had two beginner lessons in Tignes and we mostly practised on the green slope after a few basics on the nursery slope. After a couple of days skiing, I also tackled a blue slope – it was tricky but not too much for me, even as a total beginner. Read more about my experience in my post, Learning to Ski with Mark Warner. Don’t worry about accidentally finding yourself on an expert level slope, everything is clearly signposted – and you have to take a chair lift to get to the top of slopes that are higher than green.

Are there bathrooms on ski slopes? As a frequent pee-er, this is something I was worried about. I sort of imagined that the ski slopes were on a mountainside in the middle of nowhere with not a bathroom in sight – hence all those jokes about yellow snow. But yes, there are Chalet in Tignesbathrooms at the ski runs! Usually several runs will start/end at the same place and here there’ll be bars, restaurants, shops, and some kind of ski centre which will have a bathroom.

What is après ski? The phrase literally means “after ski” and it essentially refers to getting drunk after skiing. It generally lasts from around 3pm to 6pm, with drinks deals and live music in lots of bars. You can leave your skis and poles outside the bar and wear your ski gear inside – there’s no fashion contest here! Après ski is great fun and definitely an unmissable experience for your first ski trip. Top Tip: swap one of your skis with a friend and pair them up in an odd pair to leave them in the ski rack, as this makes them harder to steal!

I hope you found this post helpful. If you have a question please leave a comment below and I’ll do my best to help!

This post was written in association with MUSTO, and my recent ski trip was hosted by Mark Warner Holidays. All words and opinions are my own. A few affiliate links have been used in this article – this doesn’t affect the price you’ll pay and helps support the running of my site. 

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Advice for First Time Skiers

About Emily Luxton

An award-winning writer and travel blogger on a mission to explore the world through deeper, more intelligent travel. Seeking out adventure, cultural exchanges, food experiences and more as she attempts to get to know the world. Lover of the great outdoors, sunsets, good food, and the odd bit of luxury!


  1. I have still not done this in my life but when I do, I know where to look for tips 😀

  2. Age must be catching up on me. Each time I feel like doing it, I chicken out at the last minute. Looks terribly fun though.

  3. Seems like you had the perfect weather for your first trip, emily!
    It was kind of funny reading your guide cuz..welll for one skiing since the age of 3 all these things you describe are like second nature and nothing i’d even waste a single thought about.

    You might want to add a back protector to your list of things to wear. Especially for starters this might be a good item to take a long. (if you opt for snow boarding this is a must!)

    As for helm – try to pick one that has a GoPro fixing at the top.

    The single most important item for starting out in my opinion is a water proof snow suit and good gloves. You might fall a bit and be in contact with snow a lot. Not so pleasant if you are all soaking wet.

    anyway…hope you do continue to ski! 😀

    • Thanks for commenting Norman! Most of these tips probably seem like totally basic stuff to a seasoned skier – but I had no idea about any of them before my trip! It’s funny how easy it is to forget what beginners need to know 😉

      Back protector seems like a good suggestion. I didn’t wear one and no one recommended me to. I think if you’re on the baby slopes and the green runs it’s unlikely you’d do yourself much damage, I never really went fast enough to hurt myself if I fell! Decent snow suit and gloves, though, they really are a MUST!

  4. Great post 🙂 the classification of slopes is really helpful, however something to bear in mind is that not all resorts can stick to this. I recently went to st anton, blues there really should be classed as low reds! Had I not been on a few trips beforehand I’m not sure I’d have enjoyed learning there. So I’d recommend trip advisor-ing before booking to see if it’s first time skier friendly.

    Also when you get feel brave enough to move on from the nursery slopes, definitely always wear a helmet. Even experienced skiers/boarders fall and even more so when your learning. And they keep your head and ears lovely and warm!

    • Thanks for commenting Holly 🙂 Good point about the slop classifications – but do you know if St Anton also had nursery and green slopes? Because I think these are always more or less the same so they’re perfect to learn on! But it would definitely always be worth searching for the best beginner resorts when booking a first trip, for sure!

      You’re definitely right about helmets. I’d never ski without one – you never know what might happen!

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